Desktop Recycle Bin    "Gone but not dead"
Window 95, 98 & NT
Location: Desktop (Icon)
| Directory | Disclaimer |

By Default when Windows is installed, a "Recycle Bin" short cut icon is placed on your desktop normally located on the left side and illustrated in red box below.  DELETE is the most abused command on a computer and is often used without thought or accidentally executed.  The Recycle Bin is the systems safety net for files and folders.  Most deletions are not really deleted but sent to the Recycle Bin for further consideration. The down side of this system is that all the files in the Bin are accessing your RAM and loads when you start your computer.  If you have a lot of files that have been deleted, their memory could over load your RAM and cause spooling from the Hard Drive.  As a result, your computer will really slow down.  I have had 30 or more megs in the Recycle Bin at one time.  If you are running on 32 megs of RAM or less, you will have to empty the Bin often to have your machine run efficiently.  Missing a shortcut? Look in the Recycle Bin for it.

To Open Recycle Bin:
Double Click the Icon.  Note: I have two files that have been deleted and for consideration to permanently delete. If you deleted a Folder, the content or the files in that folder are deleted as well and will not display all the files in the folder, just the folder.
To Empty: 
Select Menu "File", 
then select "Empty Recycle Bin".
To Restore a file or folder:
Select the file or folder you want restored like example 
(They should be in alphabetical order)
Select Menu "File", next select "Restore". Done.

It's that simple.

Note: Deletions in programs are normally permanent deletions and may not go to the Recycle Bin. However, they may have a safety feature built into the program like a back up file.


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Revised: December 18, 2010     jerry@proseals.net                 Home